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'm debra norville. >> stephanie: how about you jim? >> i'm katie couric. >> stephanie: what a news day yesterday. poor wolf blitzer. they'll have to leave it there. can you tell his accent from the surveillance video? what how would you be able to tell his accent from his surveillance video? >> were you able to see think pass port from the surveillance video. >> stephanie: the suspect was not arrested in the boston bombing, and he clearly was not darked skinned . oh other than that -- >> if he had been arrested he would have been dark skinned. >> stephanie: you remember hurricane katrina, we have done this with aisha tyler before. this is what happens when anchors have to fill time jim. oh, jack, look at all of those people, so hungry so poor so black. [ laughter ] [ wah wah ] >> stephanie: oh yes he did. it has provided all of the comedy fodder for aisha tyler and her husband, because she says literally at lunch every day she says i'm so hungry so black. [ applause ] >> stephanie: it's like a matinee performance every date their house. and there is a consolation
points. well i'll be a monkey's uncle. and we got a hundred dollars in points from sears to use on jim's mower... hold the phone! ...and points from the grill helped pay for my dress... now you're just pulling my leg. get this, sometimes points just show up in our account. get out of town! with points from shop your way there are more ways to save than ever at sears. oh and this bracelet... i used points to get it for free. yeah, right. and i'm married to lorenzo lamas. hola. this is how to save. this is sears. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] for those who willingly take on the day... ♪ ♪ ...to make it better for someone else. the same way the smooth, creamy taste of coffee-mate... makes coffee and your day better. coffee-mate. coffee's perfect mate. nestle. good food, good life. am i interrupting something? another viva dare. our fans think there's a rule that a paper towel can't handle this. fans? now that's tough when wet. [ peggy ] grab viva and break the rules on all your tough messes. this is what they do for fun. [ female announcer ] the only patch for the tre
night and this morning is they are making it up as they go. i agree with jim. now that we have the lead individual, the older brother dead, the younger one has to make decisions. as an fbi hostage negotiator, this is the type of guy we would like to talk to. we contain him and isolate him from contact with the outside world and we negotiate and we help him identify reasons to live. that's what fbi negotiators and atf will be trying to do. if they can get him located in one place, time is somewhat on our side. it's unprecedented to shut a city down like this. it sets a terrible example for people in the future, but right now this is what we have to deal with. >> when i heard about the 7-11 and you hear about them with the mit police officer, why would you dru attention to yourself? they had to know that they were going to be pursued. is that tied to the fact and when i originally saw that video yesterday that was released and taken from the department store camera, they looked calm. they looked like anybody. they almost looked confident-cocky to me. there is the video to me. they are wal
and a house committee is set to look whether or not it should actually continue. chief correspondent jim angle is live in washington with more. hi, jim. >> reporter: hello, jenna. what started out as an effort to by ronald reagan to help people in rural areas to have a phone in case of emergencies what critics suspect is a new welfare program, listen. >> the cost has gone from $143 million a few years ago, to $2.2 billion today, a 15 times increase. >> reporter: now the cost of the program lept after cell phones were added in 2008. only those on low income programs such as welfare and food stamps legally qualify. but lawmakers say the program is out of control. >> i got a solicitation for a free phone at my apartment which is certainly not in a building where you're going to have people who are qualified for free phones. there is clearly money being wasted here. >> the fcc said in a recent year there were 270,000 beneficiaries that had more than one of these subsidized cell phones that is completely against the law right there. >> reporter: now funded by a small tax on all phone bills you can
, and the politico median and author of "the pleat idiot's quite to comedy writing" jim mendrinos. when is it too soon to talk about politics after a tragedy or is it different in every situation. >> i think there are different aspects of politics that can be discussed like barney frank was trying to make a point thank god we have infrastructure. >> john: first responders. >> today perhaps not, but you know,-- >> john: would you agree with me that barney frank kind of crossed the line when he began relating it to the sequester and implied it would have been much worse when it was it's not proven. >> but that's not a question-- >> but newtown, you should be talking about gun control immediately. i'm sorry but yes. >> i think when you're on topic it's never too soon. if you say people with bombs pretty bad people, what can we do to prevent it, let's have that conversation. >> but that's stretching. >> it's not a question of too soon but too ignorant. does your comment have merit? after newtown that was the time to say we need to have sensible gun legislation. the only appropriate reaction to what h
afternoon. to help us through the issues of the day today ambassador jim jones, former u.s. ambassador to mexico will be here in studio with us. igor volsky, of course here as he is every tuesday from think progress and a very exciting guest today and an unusual guest, randy couture a former mma boxing star, a boxing star and an mma star and a great actor, too. extenders? >> expendables. i think he's a chump and i'm going to tell him that to his face. >> bill: he will crush you! >> you're probably right. >> bill: he will crush you. >> you're definitely right! >> bill: i have a friend who wrestled with him. >> no kidding! >> bill: he told him didn't stand a chance. flattened him out. >> if you're not familiar with randy, go online and do a google image search for him. >> bill: i'm afraid of him already. >> there are a lot of pictures of him with his shirt off. he is chilled out of rock. >> bill: i'm afraid of him already. i'm going to have cyprian come in and stand alongside of me. >> your body guard? [ laughter ] perfect. >> bill: all right. and yes indeed, they're whining about air tr
. let's bring in retired atf special agent in charge, nbc news analyst jim cavanaugh. jim, it's, it's a changing situation. but certainly it is a dramatic scene. it almost looks like a war zone, streets empty, we don't know how many officers are on the scene. but the tension seems to be remarkably high. there's some thought that perhaps dzhokah tsarnaev is holed up and is being negotiated with at this point. >> alex, that's exactly right. you know when you're in command of a situation like this, i always like to break it down to the main things that handle the main crisis points and address those. and there's three interlocking rings here that are affecting boston and the citizens. and that's what the commanders have got to focus on. one is the standoff with dzhokhar, we can talk about how that interlocks and what's going on there. the second is, the placement of another pressure cooker device in the city that they've located. and the question of are there more. and then the third interlocking circle is, whether or not there's these two accomplices, as pete williams described and ma
are in the nature of the bomb. >>> up next, abc's senior national correspondent jim avila, shows us just how far the blast from the bombs traveled. >> reporter: the killer bombs likely contained less than two pounds of common black powder explosive, says one of the nations leading ied experts. even leaving the characteristic white smoke. bombs designed to spread terror and death with a lethal blast of metal shrapnel. >> looks like he was out to kill and maim. >> reporter: hold it right there. here we see windows blown out here, but the buildings themselves are intact. what does that tell us about what this bomber wanted to do? >> that he did not want to take down the building. that wasn't his main target. it was to disrupt the marathon and kill people in that immediate area. >> reporter: houston says this is classic ied design, the kill zone from the blast, one to two yards. according to the accounts from the bomb's site, powerful enough to knock a runner off his feet ten yards away. and topple another man on his couch from the third floor of the building next door, 20 yards away. >> it looks li
dollars in points from sears to use on jim's mower... hold the phone! ...and points from the grill helped pay for my dress... now you're just pulling my leg. get this, sometimes points just show up in our account. get out of town! with points from shop your way, there are more ways to save than ever at sears. oh and this bracelet... i used points to get it for free. yeah, right. and i'm married to lorenzo lamas. hola. this is how to save. this is sears. see lioutdoors, or in.ight. transitions® lenses automatically filter just the right amount of light. so you see everything the way it's meant to be seen. maybe even a little better. visit your eyecare professional today to ask about our newest lenses, transitions vantage and transitions xtractive lenses. experience life well lit. ask which transitions adaptive lens is best for you. don't blame him. instead, rely on frontline plus. it kills adult fleas and ticks, plus flea eggs and larvae, destroying future generations. ask your vet about frontline plus. >> now from abc7 news, good morning, breaking news on a haz-mat situation in the south
at the same time. people can also fork out $500 to attend a joe montana autograph signing or $150 to see jim harbaugh at a stadium event. the new stadium will cost $1.2 billion when all is said and done. >>> sal, everything okay in san jose? >> yes, it is. it is a little bit slower than it was. northbound as you drive up through downtown and get into the valley, it will be slow. but we don't have any major crashes on the way. just people getting back to work and we don't have -- we don't see anything really terrible here. the traffic continues to slow on 101 as well by the way getting up to the 880 interchange. we had an earlier crash at the toll plaza. they had to get those cars out of the way. for a while, even the carpool lanes were slowing down. it does look like they've cleared the crash and the traffic is beginning to recover. southbound 880, there was a crash at the bottom of the ramp. 880, it's been causing slow traffic on the nimitz freeway. 7:38. let's go to steve. >>> clear skies, not much of a breeze. hardly anything at all. at the surface, almost everyone says calm. toughest for
, mother jones has new research. this is shocking, jim. you will be shocked. new research confirms gun rampages are rising and armed civilians don't stop them. okay. we'll get to that. all of that stuff. >> stephanie: all of the stuff we've been talking about. because people like to say they don't have any -- yes we have facts! and statistics. all right. we'll get to all of that as we continue. 17 minutes after the hour. people carbonite. why? huh? why wouldn't you have carbonite just for the peace of mind alone. these days, everything we know or have is in our computers financial documents creative stuff, your music. >> videos. >> stephanie: right? you're busy. hard to remember stuff like that to back stuff up. remember you had to keep backing up. >> on floppy disks. >> stephanie: all the time. carbonite online back-up hassle free to back up your files. it backs up files to the cloud automatically and continuously when you're connected to the internet. carbonite does all of the work for you you don't have to remember to do it again. carbonite has a back-up plan that's right for you. $
tsavraev, at the request of the russian government. cnn's national political correspondent jim acosta joins us from washington now with what's going on. a lot of frustration, a lot of what ifs, could if this boston magnificent y massacre been prevented? those are the questions that will be brought forward today. >> that's right, wolf. it will be playing out on capitol hill. the senate intelligence committee has set a hearing for 2:30 this afternoon with fbi officials, they will be the lead briefers at this hearing. i'm told from a source of that committee. lawmakers want to find out if federal investigators somehow failed to see big red flags coming from tamerlan tsavraev. as lawmakers are praising authorities for the quick work in the boston bombing case, members of congress are still calling for hearings, into the fbi's handling of dead suspect tamerlan tsavraev, who traveled back to a dangerous region of russia, just last year. >> what did he do, when he went back for six months? sit in his aunt and uncle's home for six months or doing something else? and when he came back to this countr
and jim cramer. >> good morning, jim. >> lots to talk about. we account talk about boston and the impact on the market. i would love to hear your view on the psychology there, but also coca cola there. goldman sachs, j&j, we had good numbers. >> coca-cola doesn't have to say anything positive and people absolutely lap it up as they've done for all of the consumer products company and everies single one whereas, goldman sachs they just put a single boilerplate line about what everybody knows which is the macro environment and you're supposed to throw the stock out. i think that is a mistake, and i think the book value is for real. j & j is blessed. he's making it better. j & j and coca-cola, andrew, after boston, hey, you what? i'm take them. it's after boston. boston signifies the psychological terror that people feel when they buy anything other than what's in the supermarket. >> we were talking, i think in the 6:00 hour about sort of is this going to be a major psychological shift that people have come out and says not only a huge tragedy, but it will change the way people think about
asked. i do have one nature requests. yesterday we had a briefing by jim clapper on the intelligence budget going forward and produced a chart, which basically showed the ongoing sequester budget and other i would ask if you could check within perhaps, it is chart number 11 in his presentation. give us a similar visual breakdown of what your budget looks like, including as we now know the sequester on an ongoing basis. if we don't do anything about it, what does it do? i found this information yesterday to be very important because it shows real cuts. not cuts to grow, the real teeming nations of the funds available and it would be helpful to the committee to see that data as the books over the next 10 years, you look at the direct is chart and you'll see what i'm saying. >> we will, senator. thank you. >> one other quick comment and i'm sure you fellas know this as well as i do. one of the first things is deferring maintenance. but deferring maintenance isn't saving. if they cause someone has to pay in the future and i'm sure you agree. >> we do agree. >> you actually end up paying
the fresh faced perky oscar winning actress we have seen on screen. she was driven by her husband jim pope when he was pulled over on suspicion of drunk driving. the state trooper conducted a field sobriety test on mr. totes in this sobriety test. witherspoon kept getting out. she yelled out a few things that are now more famous than any lines in her movies. the reports said she asked the trooper do you know my name? later said you are about to find out who i am. witherspoon was in new york sunday at the red carpet at the premiere of her new movie "mud." released a statement saying i clearly had one drink too many and i am deeply embarrassed about the things i said. it was definitely a scary situation and i was frightened for my husband but that's no excuse. i was disrespectful to the officer who was doing his job. monday her mother filled in for her in court. they have been filming a movie "the good lie." no one imaged the video people would be watching would be of the star being led into the atlanta city jail. >>> in the wake of her arrest reese witherspoon canceled a scheduled appearanc
jim mcconville, who is there with our troops. we know historically, the chechens have had activity in afghanistan. but there doesn't seem to be any evidence of any threats on our soil here in the united states, from the chechens. this would be something new. and the question we will have to learn, as they review everything, including all the activities of these two brothers on the day of the marathon and since, is whether or not they had contact with anyone outside of the united states, any known jihaddists or terror groups. we did see them remove a computer today from the sister of the two brothers. perhaps there will be in -- will be some evidence there. one captured, in the hospital, having surgery right now. the younger of the two. one killed in a shootout with police that happened a day ago. and the question now, gregg, is whether or not they are connected. let's ask dr. walead farris, a fox news terrorism analyst. how important is it to find out what kecks they have, beyond each other? >> oh, very important because those connections are going to tell us two things. number 1,
three deaths. cnn's jim spellman is in peoria, illinois. >> good morning, christine. you can see the waters coming up here. this is not too unusual here but it's got about another two feet to go. so far these sandbag levees are holding. they hope that remains the case. from north dakota to indiana, to mississippi. flad watches and warning throughout the middle of the country as rain water from torrential spring storms barrels down rivers and streams. >> so far it's held. >> reporter: in peoria heights, katie eaten hopes these sandbags and this pump will protect her home from the rising illinois river. what's it like to know your home's at risk? >> it's scary. i've had family lose house to floods, so i mean i know what to expect. but it's -- it's scary. >> reporter: at the end of the block, neighbors gail and jerry knew their home would be the first to flood. they spent the last few days removing all their possessions knowing they would likely never move back into their home of 13 years. you were prepared, but what is it like to actually watch your home go under water? >> it's dev
this morning with more rain sadly in the forecast. i feel terrible saying that. cnn's jim spellman is in one of those towns. he's in peoria, illinois. jim, people there are looking at water levels, i understand, that haven't been this high in more than 60 years. >> since the 1940s since the illinois river here in peoria came up this high. but it's not just peoria. rivers across the midwest are flooding. from north dakota to indiana to mississippi, flood watches and warnings throughout the middle of the country, as rainwater from torrential spring storms barrels down rivers and streams. >> so far it's held. >> reporter: in peoria heights, katie eaten hopes these sandbags and this pump will protect her home from the risele illinois river. what's it like to know your home's at risk? >> it's scary. i've had family lose house to floods, so i mean i know what to expect. but it's -- it's scary. >> reporter: at the end of the block, neighbors gail and jerry knew their home would be the first to flood. they spent the last few days removing all their possessions knowing they would likely never move ba
now. u.s. remember at the beginning of the iraq war, jim asked me a question, does this still hold true today? do movie stars need be afraid to speak out? and i would say, yes. the lesson is, if what you care about is your pocketbook, if you want to speak out and be pro patriotic and defend america right or wrong, you'll never get in trouble. if you want to be critical of foreign policy because you belief, as a citizen -- remember, we have a thing called the constitution. all men are created equal. everybody, at least from the beginning, white, male, 2 1, with property, could vote. since then we've expanded -- well, i'm not being sarcastic because in terms of the world to have any white male who was sovereign, that we were sovereign. the american revolution declared the people sovereign rather than a king or queen. you couldn't have a king or queen taking your land away because they had finch it to you through sovereign rights. so if every citizen has a right to say what they should or should not do in our government, we would think we could respect that, and yet at the very begi
. and welcome to both of you. >> thank you. >> brown: jim jones, indisputable that the united states practiced torture. at the time the justice department said otherwise, that within very strict rules this was not torture. what made you say this was? >> well, an exhaustive study of the laws of court cases, of the practice, of interviews and the summary of all of it was it was indisputable there was torture in many cases. >> brown: just to be clear: you didn't have subpoena power here and so how were you doing it? you said by talking to people? >> well, the staff and some of the panel members visited several countries, visited the black sites where some of these were in poland, lithuania, et cetera, they talked to officials, they talked to detainees themselves, and they did an exhaustive research of the law and the united states has even brought prosecutions for the very same things that we did in some of those sites. >> brown: david irvine, former u.s. ambassador john bolton told the kwra +*eup that "this report is completely divorced from reality." the procedures were in his words "lawyered a
away with it. they were not expecting this to happen within a couple of days. >> final question, jim, for the moment. the individual, the youngest brother, dzhokhar, he, as we know, is on the loose. the police believe that they have him in a contained area. how does this end? i mean, obviously he's a font of information alive, but how does it end? >> well, he could be dead. you know, there's a report there was blood found and he may have been wounded in the huge shootout with the police, 200 rounds are fired. he could have been wounded and he could be dead under one of those houses or in garage back there. so he could have bled out. that's one possibility. he could have killed himself is another possibility. he could be hiding there with a bomb strapped on him that he may detonate when the agents and detectives and police surround him. or he may surrender. so that's -- or try to get through to cordon. that's about his options right there, and that's about how it will play out. we'll see in the ensuing hours. you know, we knew when the pictures were put out that before the sun rose at
force discussed their findings on >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important report. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese- americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post- 9/11 environment. were's some key questions wanted to address this morning. one is the treatment
unemployed during the great depression, and you had jim crow where it was legal and de facto segregation. you didn't find the same kind of criminality. we have spent $16 trillion since 1965 on poverty, and what we've done is we've destabilized families. that is why when a kid sees a gang banger, as you mentioned, he looks at that gang banger and thinks, hey, this is what i want to be. he doesn't have a father to say, wait a second, this is not the way to go. hit the books two good, hard hours a day. finish high school, don't have a kid before you're 20 years old and get married before you have that kid. if you do that, you will not be poor. the question we have to ask ourselves is, what policies are we doing that are giving people the incentive or disincentive to follow that formula? >> host: larry elder, a conversation between you and your mother beginning with your mother. your mother thought -- your father thought small. don't make the same mistake. that's unfair. oh, here you go again, defending him. he's not donald trump. he was a wimp, she said. >> guest: yeah. my mother -- she was in a
jim harbaugh at stadium preview event. the new stadium will cost $1.2 billion when all is said and done. >>> your time is 6:07. there will soon be more options if you ride the ferry between south san francisco and the east bay. starting next monday, they are adding a 6:20 p.m. trip. right now the last ferry leaves at 5:20. now ridership has been down so the ferry operators are hoping that adding more evening trips will attract more commuters. they also hope to attract more tourists and school trips. >>> we are looking at the bridge pam and dave. and westbound bay bridge is becoming more crowded as you come up to the pay gates. even though the metering lights are not on. that is why you have that big empty spot there for the fast track. but once they turn the metering lights on at 6:15 that empty spot will go away. looking at the san mateo bridge it looks pretty good. there was a car fire westbound 92 near industrial. it's on the shoulder. could cause slow traffic on the way to the san mateo bridge. this morning if you are driving on 92 over to 101 traffic there looks good. 6:08
it and start over, not expand it bret? >> bret: all right, jim. thank you. the treasury department says the internal revenue service the irs overpaid up to $13.6 billion in tax credits designed for low income families last year. the report finds the irs in violation of requirements that it set and meet payment reduction targets that it set and meet payment reduction targets. still ahead, emotions come to the surface over boston and immigration reform. first after a week of domestic turmoil, the president turns his focus to international turmoil. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. happening in that department. >> while the president responded to domestic terrorism in boston last week and monitored the search for suspects,
's jim acosta just recently spoke to vice president joe biden. let's briefly check in with him. jim, what did the vice president say? >> we caught up with vice president joe biden as he was heading into an event to honor former congressional staffer gabe zimmerman, the staffer gunned down in the shooting that also wounded former congressman gabrielle giffords in tucson. that event is going on now. the vice president is speaking right now. as he was heading into that event, we threw a quick question at mr. biden about the events up in boston, what, if anything, he knows about the investigation. and he acknowledged that the government at this point doesn't have any hard information as he called it in this case. here is what he had to say. >> mr. vice president, any comment on what is happening in boston right now? >> we're going to get to the bottom of this. we don't have any hard information yet, but i can assure you we will find out who did it and bring them to justice. >> no sense as to whether this is domestic or foreign-based. >> not yet. >> and you can hear there as the vice president
a difference in the development of this project and important report. as jim mentioned, there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning that we want to hit some of the highlights. we hope he will take the entire report, study it through and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i looked back in history to the time during world war ii that we in turn to some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do but in light of history, it was an error. as of today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post 9/11 environment. there are some key questions we wanted to address this morning. one, did the treatment of suspected terrorists and u.s. custody rise to the left of torture? second how did this happen and what can we learn from this to make better decisions to the future. we found the u.s. personnel in many instances used interrogation techniques on detainee's that constitute torture. american
of the task force discussed their findings on wednesday at the national press lub. >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important eport. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the sandrite proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions we
gifford has an op ed this morning. jim is a republican. what you think about what the senate did? we havehere in delaware plenty of gun laws. sure that is the case in a lot places in the country where somebody gets arrested with a gun crime, usually they are able to eliminate that. they do not prosecute for illegal guns. there are plenty of guns laws already. it is just a matter of having the prosecutors have in the nerve to enforce these laws. this is just another attempt by the federal government to disarm the people of the united states and it is not going to make any favorites. lot of this is a distraction from the economy and the fact they refuse to do anything to cut back on the sides of the government. host: are you a gun owner? caller: i do not own a gun but pretty much everyone else i know owns a gun. -- here ins castle new castle, a lot of people did not have guns. guns start leaking out towards this area. people are very open a round here about gun under ship. about gun ownership. are there any further regulations you would support on gun buying? isler: no, i just think it
thing in the world can happen to a city and dumb sportscasters will go, three hours, jim, this city forget there was a nuclear blast. >> something different was going on there. >> here, it can only happen in boston because boston is a one sports team town. at the end of the day, the sox that pull the entire team together. >> fenway. >> and fenway, the cathedral to a city. it had to be an amazing day there. >> it was. it was an amazingly emotional afternoon. it was a cathartic moment. a baseball game happened to have been played but it was if a tiny basilica on the back bay and the region was attracted to it. the suspected suspect had been successfully captured the evening before. neil diamond called the red sox switchboard. >> are you kidding me? >> called the red sox switchboard and said i'm in town, my name is neil diamond. i'd like to come and sing the song and he showed up. >> wow. >> to the surprise -- >> which, of course, people are watching that don't know, that's been a tradition. >> yeah, for a long, long time, many years. middle of the eighth inning, they sing it. >> it's
in the united states senate joking or perhaps half joking that jim demint should run for president. this isn't exactly what i had in mind. [laughter] perhaps he misunderstood me. you know, the ting that makes jim demint a great leader is the same thing that has always made people like matt spalding and the heritage foundation itself so very valuable; that is, your shared insistence on making the positive case for conservativism, what conservatives are for. in washington it's common for both parties to succumb to easy negativity. republicans and democrats stand opposed to each other, obviously, and outspoken partisanship almost always gets the most headlines. this negativity is unappealing on pote sides, and that helps explain why the federal government is increasingly held in such low regard by the american people. but for the left the defensive crouch at least makes sense. liberalism's main purpose today is to defend itself past gains -- its past gains from conservative reform. but megativity on the right, to my mind, makes no sense at all. the left has created this false narrative that lib
's jim dickey has some answers. >> good morning, john, diana. tracking a cold front. pushing eastward, seeing soaking rainfall this morning across portions of the midwest. and snow in the ohio valley, and snow in the twin cities, into wisconsin. back on into denver. good news is the snow does wind down but not before many spots have picked up as much as 6 to 12 inches of snow, twin cities area up into canada. this is while we are seeing soaking rainfall here. many of the spots. river levels fall from record levels. flash flooding, major concern where the rain is falling. but all of the rain, all of the floodwater continues to filter down the mississippi. many spots southward still watching the rivers rise. widespread major flooding ongoing here through the week. john and diana, back to you. >> jim, thank you. >>> to boston now where top officials have kicked off fund raidsing. efforts for the victims of the marathon bombing. >> that's right. the one fund boston has already gotten $1 million commitment from the john hancock insurance company. you can see the number one prominently on t
shrapnel designed to maim anyone standing by and jim avila has more. it's not hard to find out how to build one. >> reporter: it's not. investigators are learning more about the anatomy of the bombs and abc news confirming the common cooking appliance used in their construction was a midsize fager brand pressure cooker. unfortunately, the pot maker sells 50,000 a year of those in the united states. this is what remains of what investigators believe could be the crude but effective bomb used in boston. the american military knows them well. the pressure cooker bomb. homemade and designed to maim and kill. this video of military units detonating one in afghanistan posted on youtube. this one found on the internet from the streets of nepal. so common the department of defense handbook on spotting roadside bombs warns soldiers and marines to be on the lookout for that innocent pressure cooker and publications all over the internet teach the construction of a bomb made from mom's kitchen, why so popular? because pressure cookers seal so tightly and can be filled with nails and ball bearings and
that an agreement and all the responsibility for the gaza strip and hamas? >> good question. >> jim, the microphone is coming. >> good to see you again. as you knoi m believer in when yowritwhen you said d so forgive me for what i'm about to say that i'm very frustrated middle east peace activist for those of you that money i've been involved in this for over 23 years trying to organize the churches in this area and have spoken in other parts of the country as well. so, with that in mind please forgive me because this is a harsh question you as well as everyone in this room i think you are all living in a fantasy and i am, too and here is the problem. in your presentation, you talked about the arab street and how connected they are and you're absolutely right. but you didn't with the public opinion in this country. you have got to. we are democracy and we are not disconnected from the public opinion. when you look as i have done at public opinion onisrael and palestine for the last 20 years, guess what, over 50% of americans support israel. less than 10% with a few exceptions, the war was one of th
a difference in the development of this project and important report. as jim mentioned, there are more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those. we hope you will take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it is important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history durling the time to -- during the time to world war ii that we intered some japanese americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. in the right of history, it was an error. so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in some of the post 9/11 environment. there are key questions we want to answer this morning. one, did the treatment rise to torture? secondly, how did it happen? what can we learn from this to make better decisions in the future? on the first question, we found u.s. personnel in many instances used ininterrogation techniques on detainees that constitutional torture. military personnel conducted cruel, inhumane, or degrading treatment. both c
be calls for negotiation with this government. bear in mind that these are all legitimize jim jong un's rule. whatever else they do, they are a signal to home that this guy has engainled the outside world on his own terms. it reads very well back home. of course the north koreaian side wants face-saving solutions. given his calculations and the circumstances of this state, i submit that kim jong un and company can stand to lose a little face when they play this way. they deserve to, and if we are smart, we will range that outcome dwsharge that outcome every time we have a pleasant situation like this. thank you. >> thank you. my lane in the road is south korea. south korea's approach, military reform since 2010. it will be perhaps a bit more tactical. cumulatively, south korea is much more likely to respond to a clash. i think the situation has changed not only in the blue house but in the lay of the land as well as the political landscape. first of all, the new south koreaian president has vowed publicly and in private to respond forcibly and really exponentially, the next time nort
is a conservative republican, a former democratic member of congress jim jones and this study, this group looked at the question of torture and came to some amazing conclusions. number one, they said there is no doubt, no doubt, that the united states engaged in the practice of torture under the bush administration. this is just under george bush and dick cheney, number 1. we did engage in torture. it was illegal. it was against international law. number 3, we did it even though there is no firm or persuasive evidence, reading from the report, that they produced any valuable information or any information that we could not have gotten through other means, zero evidence of anything out of that torture. and he engaging in torture, from the bi-partisan report quote, damaged the standing of our nation reducedour capacity to enact moral 7censure and increased the danger to u.s. military personnel taken captive. we did it. it was illegal, we got nothing out of it. we damaged our standing, we made our own military -- put our own military more at risk and more in danger
county police chief jim johnson, assault weapons are -- quote -- "meant for the battlefield." milwaukee chief of police, ed flynn, "military characteristics are not simply cosmetic in nature. these weapons are designed for combat." end quote. and john walsh, the united states attorney for colorado couldn't be more clear. "these weapons, he said, "are crafted to be as effective as possible at killing human beings." end quote. now, where are we today? seven states and the district of columbia banned assault weapons prior to the newtown, massacre. these are my own state, california, connecticut, d.c., hawaii, maryland, massachusetts, new york, and new jersey. since newtown, legislators in 20 states have introduced bills to either ban assault weapons or strengthen existing bans. 20 states are now contemplating action. connecticut and new york passed laws to tighten their existing bans, to prohibit assault weapons with one military characteristic, which is what we do in this bill. maryland expanded an existing ban on assault pistols to cover rifles and assault shotguns. in massachusetts and
by retiring senator jim bunting. he won decisively in the general. when he got to the senate, he quickly founded the tea party caucus. finally, for you breakfast tea party buff, a group of which i may be the only member, of our nearly 3800 breakfasts, only two times have we had both a father and a son as guests. we hosted former representative ron paul in september 2011. the only other father/son team was mitt romney and his dad, michigan governor george romney. so much for biography and breakfast trivia. now on to mechanical manners. as always, we're on the record. please, no live blogging or tweeting, in short, no filing of any kind while the breakfast is underway. there's no embargo when the breakfast is over except that c-span has agreed to the to use video of the session for at least an hour after the breakfast ends to give those of us in the room a chance to file. if you'd like to ask a question, please, do the traditional thing and send me a subtle, nonthreatening signal, and i'll happily call. we'll start off by offering our guest the opportunity to make some opening comments. an
activated and incident management assistant jim, three preliminary damage assessment teams, and we are also standing by to assist in any other way. our eoc remains at level three, which is at increased readiness. we will continue to monitor the events over the course of the day and provide you with updates as they are relevant. i might add, mr. chairman, that many of the things i've just gone through are examples of the kinds of activities that have been supported by the committee, through fema, through the various grants that we supply, search and rescue being a good example of the kinds of things that grants have been supporting increasing our capacity for response and resilience as a nation. so that is the most recent on west, texas. with respect to boston, we are, we are investi this as an act of terror. we ae assisting. ice is part of the jttf. we have over four dozen ice agents now assigned to the boston office helping in the investigation. cdp is assisting in a number of tays immediately after the we work to close logan, the ground air for a few hours and to institute special targeti
, jim. >> we can go a couple of different directions here, we can talk about the man hunt where it is and how it's dwell developing or the geopolitical, what are you most interested in? >> in the first hand, the law enforcement will peck up the known suspect, possible third man involved hopefully without further loss of life. they're obviously extremely dangerous, armed with both firearms as well as possibly bombs. the chechen connection is very interesting. i'm sure right now they're on the phone with the russians and what they have with this family or their connection. are they being mentored or encouraged by terrorists in the country? the russians have had a terrible time with the chechens over the years, but the march with the double suicide bombing on the moscow subway killed 40 people. in november 2009 there was another train bombing that killed 26. so this has been a very dangerous, islamic region, not just chechnya, but also the north caucasus countries. i should also add that we have a lot of these people in both afghanistan and pakistan, foreign fighters and the cheche
people on the books, find out who they are. the issueur calls on of boy scouts of america we welcome jim to the conversation from oklahoma. good morning. the gay crowd wants to push how they live on uni. they should be able to decide their own rules and the government should be completely out of it. just like the gay marriage thing. if they want to get married, fine. if a certain church doesn't want to marry them, then so be it. the government should stay out of the whole issue. that's it. host: part of the debate this week on what to do with the alleged bomber involved in the killing of three bostonians over this past week. the headline, republicans want the boston bombing suspect treated as an enemy combatants, sparking miranda debate. key republicans are calling on the obama administration to declare the 19-year-old suspect an enemy combatant subject to the loss of four, so intelligence officials can continue to interrogate him for as long as they deem necessary. authorities captured him in watertown, mass. friday evening. they are invoking the public .afety exception he remains hospi
a jim demint exit at exit security system as well as economic conditions is a good thing. a variety of economic legislation in this are good on balance. >> i want america to win. >> me too. craig huey about how the u.s. is not using immigration policy effectively and as many other countries are to improve economic growth. what countries did you see as doing a good job? numbers, look at the it's in my written testimony, under core visas are for economic reasons at the moment. given the paramount need for economic growth, that cuts across our ability to deal with all our policy challenges, those will all be easier with faster economic growth. focusing on that makes more sense. other countries, we have charts in the written testimony, have a high percentage. other countries that have made reforms recently like the united kingdom looking to do this. if you look at the countries that are struggling right now and likely to fail, dejapan. europe, the exception is germany, which has undertaken a particular percentage of turkish labor. we have to recognize economic reality and adjust our pol
, that is the --. >> host: charles there is tweet relating to what you're saying. jim writes can an american citizen be considered an enemy combatant? >> guest: absolutely goes back to the civil war. goes certainly to world war ii. anwar al-awlaki was american-born. president obama use ad drone to kill him in the wilds of yemen. if you, if you fill eight yourself with enemy forces and you go to war against american citizens and you kill americans will fully and you do so on behalf of a movement or enemy forces then indeed you can be considered an enemy combatant. being a enemy combatant simply because you're an american citizen. if in world war ii you went over and joined nazi forces were you not a enemy combatant? of course you were. . . >> he didn't treat those terrible tragedies as access war, but appropriately treated them as heinous criminal acts to be investigated, prosecuted, and appropriately punishes. >> host: al-alwaki was an american citizen, kimed on orders of president obama. did president obama violate the constitution by doing that? >> guest: well, actually, we have a lawsuit in which
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